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Trump Issues Surprise Order on Mexican Holiday….And the Libs Hate It!

In the past two administrations, there has been an official celebration of Mexico’s Cinco de Mayo holiday at the White House, but that tradition has come to an end under the current administration.

The Hill reported that the 16-year-old tradition will instead be a much smaller affair held somewhere other than the White House and will feature Vice President Mike Pence as the host.

The reported modification of the White House celebration of the Mexican holiday was initially revealed by Spanish-language media outlet La Opinion, which noted that there had been no official announcement of any change in plans and cited unnamed government sources. The White House did not respond to requests for comment, according to The Hill.

Hispanic activists weren’t very pleased.

“The decision of the White House to renounce the celebration of Cinco de Mayo is another slap for many Mexican Americans and Latinos,” complained Felix Sanchez, co-founder and president of the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts. “Instead of embracing our nation’s multicultural heritage, we are deepening divisions, not looking for common ground.”

The tradition of hosting a big event celebrating Cinco de Mayo at the White House started under President George W. Bush and was continued under his successor, former President Barack Obama, who welcomed around 500 guests, a celebrity chef and popular Mexican band to the celebration in 2016.

Meanwhile, the only Cinco de Mayo celebrations that have been officially canceled thus far are those held in various cities around the country by Mexican-Americans, amid fears that immigration agents will monitor the events and round up any illegal immigrants in attendance, according to a report from The Washington Times.

It is worth noting that the Cinco de Mayo holiday — which marks the date in 1862 of the Battle of Puebla, during which the Mexican army held off invading French forces — is typically only solemnly observed in Mexico, with Mexican-Americans and others in the U.S. being the ones treating the holiday as an occasion for festive celebration. (Mexico’s real Independence Day is Sept. 16.)